Spencer S. Eccles Rail Center

ROLLING STOCK OF THE UTAH STATE RAILROAD MUSEUM

Locomotives- Diesel

Total units: 11

Cargill 6751: SW1

Carghill

Builder………………………..Electro-Motive Division
Construction Number…………………….…………1111
Built…………………………….……..September 1940
Engines………………………Model 6-567 Serial 1624

This locomotive began life as Baltimore & Ohio 213, and later became B&O 8413. It was sold to Arco Petroleum in Carson, California, and renumbered 8417, then later Arco 6971. Sold to General American Tank Car (GATX) in Colton, California, keeping the same number. Cargill purchased the unit from Western Railway Supply, a used equipment dealer, and moved it to Ogden in August 1993 for use at the company’s Globe Mill. In 2010 it was replaced by a Trackmobile, and Cargill donated it to the museum. It was delivered on May 21, 2011, free of charge thanks to Utah Central and Union Pacific. It is one of the first SW1s to be built, and when sold to the B&O was classified as an NS1.

            While out of service at the elevator, vandals stripped the wiring from the traction motors, as well as from inside the cab which remained unlocked. Cargill funded the complete repainting and restoration of the locomotive to operation. Painting was completed in November 2011. Located on Track 1.

 

 

 

 

UCRY 1237: 44-tonner

Builder…………..…….General Electric Built………………………January 1953 Construction Number…………….31875 Weight………………………….44 tons Engines…………Caterpillar D17000 V8 Power……………..………………400 hp

Builder…………..…….General Electric
Built………………………January 1953
Construction Number…………….31875
Weight………………………….44 tons
Engines…………Caterpillar D17000 V8
Power……………..………………400 hp

The 44-ton locomotive was developed in 1940 for industrial and switching use. Its weight was determined by the railroader’s unions, who stipulated that no locomotive larger than 44 tons could be operated without a two-man crew. The 44-tonners were specifically designed to be operated by a single person, but still included a seat for the fireman. The last GE 44-tonner was built in 1956, bringing the total of units made to 348.

Built as USAF 1237 and assigned to Hill Air Force Base. It is a modified version of General Electric’s standard 44-ton design, with a shorter frame and lower cab, reportedly to allow transport overseas in ships. It is equipped with Multiple-Unit controls. Donated to the museum, and subsequently leased to the Utah Central Railway, who repainted it but kept the number. It was returned to the museum and remained idle for about ten years. In 2010 the Golden Spike Chapter, R&LHS began work to return it to operation. Located on Track 2. 

 

 

 

 

 

Builder…………………..………General Electric Built……………………..…………January 1953 Construction Number………………………31874 Weight………………….…………………44 tons Engines…………..……….Caterpillar D17000 V8 Power…………………..…………………..900 hp

Builder…………………..………General Electric
Built……………………..…………January 1953
Construction Number………………………31874
Weight………………….…………………44 tons
Engines…………..……….Caterpillar D17000 V8
Power…………………..…………………..900 hp

USAF 1236: 44-tonner

Assigned to Hill Air Force Base. Equipped with MU controls, same specifications as UCRY 1237. Electrical parts from this locomotive have been purchased by the Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad, Chama, New Mexico. Located in the Eccles Rail Center.

 

 

 

 

Builder……….American Locomotive Company (ALCO) Built……………………………………...……..May 1941 Construction Number…………………………...…69469 Weight………………………….……………….105 tons Power…………………………………………….1000 hp Tractive Effort………………………..………..57,500 lbs Engine………………………....6 cylinder, Turbocharged Motors……………………………...……………..GE 731 Brakes………………………….…………..Westinghouse

Builder……….American Locomotive Company (ALCO)
Built……………………………………………..May 1941
Construction Number………………………………69469
Weight………………………….……………….105 tons
Power…………………………………………….1000 hp
Tractive Effort………………………..………..57,500 lbs
Engine………………………….6 cylinder, Turbocharged
Motors……………………………………………..GE 731
Brakes………………………….…………..Westinghouse

USAF 7277: S-1

            The S-1 class was developed by the American Locomotive Company and built by both ALCO and the Montreal Locomotive Works. The S-1s utilized ALCO’s blunt trucks, while later models (S-3 and up) used AAR type A trucks. A total of 540 units were built between April 1940 and June 1950. Assigned to Hill Air Force Base, and donated to the museum as a batch with the 44-tonners. Located in the Eccles Rail Center.

 

 

 

 

Builder……………Davenport Locomotive Manufacturing Co. Built……………………………………………………ca. 1940 Weight…………………………………….……………..44 tons Brakes…………………………………………….Westinghouse Top speed………………………………………………..42 mph

Builder……………Davenport Locomotive Manufacturing Co.
Built……………………………………………………ca. 1940
Weight…………………………………….……………..44 tons
Brakes…………………………………………….Westinghouse
Top speed………………………………………………..42 mph

 

 

USAF 1216: 44-tonner

This locomotive was built by Davenport for overseas (lend-lease) use, but remained at the Tooele Army Depot until donated to the museum. It is a center cab locomotive, and has the same weight as the GE’s, but in design is much different. Wasatch Rail Contractors volunteered time and materials to replace a damaged coupler and had the engines running at the time. Unlike the other Air Force locomotives in the collection, this engine is painted black with white lettering. It was last overhauled in September 1983. Located in the Eccles Rail center.

UP 26 (X-26): GTE 8500

GTE (or GTEL) stands for Gas Turbine Electric Locomotive. Union Pacific was one of the first to develop this technology in their search for more powerful locomotives to use on the steep grades between Cheyenne and Ogden. They utilize a turbine engine to power the generators, and work like a diesel locomotive in that the wheels are powered by traction motors. The fuel is Bunker C, the thick, tar-like byproduct of the refining process that was also burned by steam locomotives. Unfortunately they were plagued by problems from the beginning and were quickly replaced with more conventional diesel locomotives, including the Centennials (DDA40X).

The turbines consumed twice as much fuel as standard diesel locomotives of similar horsepower, but the low cost of Bunker C allowed their use until the fuel crisis of 1973 and the development of cracking processes that allowed the waste to be reduced to finer grades of fuel. The huge consumption required the locomotive to carry an auxiliary fuel tender, which was converted from scrapped steam locomotive tenders. When the turbines themselves were scrapped the tenders were reverted to steam use behind UP’s 844 and Challenger. The thick consistency of Bunker C required the tenders to be equipped with heating coils to soften the fuel at a temperature of 200 degrees Fahrenheit. When burned, Bunker C reduces to a fine but highly corrosive ash that would build up in the blades, eventually corroding and jamming them.

The turbines had several nicknames, among them “Bird Cookers” as the engine emitted a huge column of superheated exhaust that would consume birds in flight. They also had a tendency to quickly consume oxygen in tunnels, which caused overheating and asphyxiation. When a turbine was placed on a train going east out of Ogden, the yard switcher would push the turbine under the Riverdale Road underpass to start. The turbine would flame out, and the pavement on the overpass would melt and sometimes ignite from the huge amount of heat. All of the turbines were retired by 1970, with the 26 being retired on in February.

The locomotive is not numbered X-26, simply 26. The X is a remnant of the days when anything not on a timetable, usually freight trains, was designated as an extra by placing the X before the locomotive number. The lead unit, with the cab and secondary diesel engine, was numbered 26A; the second unit with the Turbine was 26B, and the tender numbered 26T.

In September 1971 the 26 was sold for scrap to Continental Leasing Group and shipped to Intercontinental Engineering Co. of Riverside, Missouri, and gutted before being donated to the museum in July 1987. All electrical components, the turbine, traction motors and diesel engine were removed. The units were shipped from Kansas City via Burlington Northern before being transferred to UP for the final leg into Ogden. Another turbine, number 18, is on display at the Illinois Railway Museum. The 26 is in the Eccles Rail Center.

Builder…………………………………….….General-Electric

Built…………………………………………….February 1961

Construction Numbers:

26A………………………………………………………34085

26B………………………………………………………34086

Weight…………………………………………….900,000 lbs

Length……………………………………….…………80 feet

Turbine Power…………………………………..….240,800 hp

Diesel Power………………………………..…………850 hp

Tender capacity…………….……..24,000 gallons (Bunker C)

Fuel Tank capacity………….………….2,500 gallons (Diesel)

UP 6916: DDA40X

This type of locomotive is the largest diesel locomotive ever built in the world. Nicknamed “Centennials” after the 100-year anniversary of the Golden Spike ceremony, they were ordered by Union Pacific to replace the turbines for use on the Cheyenne-Ogden runs over Sherman Hill and through Weber and Echo Canyons, but saw occasional use on other parts of the UP system. The “X” stands for “experimental”, as the Centennials were meant to be experiments in the further development of larger diesel locomotives, and the electrical systems now used in EMD’s dash-2 locomotives were introduced in the Centennials. It was also one of the first American freight locomotives to utilized the Canadian-developed “comfort cab”, which is now the standard for all modern American road locomotives. The frames were so long that they would not fit in EMD’s manufacturing plant, so were built by the John Mohr Company (Chicago, Ill.). A total of 47 were produced.

The 6916 was placed in storage on June 22, 1980, but was restored to operation in March 1984, but was removed from service in December of that year. In 1985 the locomotive saw limited service but was officially retired because of mechanical failures. For a short time it was a parts source for SD40 and SD40-2 locomotives until it was donated to the Union Station in 1985 and delivered in January 1986. The 6916 served as the research prototype for an O-scale brass model of the Centennial series imported by Overland Models in 1999.

            Eleven other locomotives from the series are preserved. Union Pacific still operates one, number 6936, as part of their Heritage Fleet. 6900 is in Omaha, Neb.; 6901 in Pocatello, Idaho; 6811 in Mexico City; 6913 in Dallas, Texas; 6915 is owned by the Southern California Chapter R&LHS; 6922 in North Platte, Nebraska; 6925 on the Dakota Southern Railway; 6930 at the Illinois Railway Museum; 6944 at the Museum of Transportation, St. Louis; and 6846 at the Western pacific Railroad Museum. The 6916 is located in the Eccles Rail Center.

Builder…………………..……………..EMD

Built………………….….…November 1969

Construction Number………………….34542

Weight………………..542,432 lbs (270 tons)

Length…………………..….98 feet, 5 inches

Power……………………..……….6,600 hp

Engines……………….Model 645E3A V-16

Fuel Capacity……………….…8,230 gallons

Gear ratio……………………..……….59/18

Maximum speed……………………80 mph

SP 7457: SD-45

The first SD45 was built in December 1965, and all of those made were purchased by Southern Pacific, AT&SF, Great Northern, and Northern Pacific. The SD45s had several minor glitches that were fixed with the upgraded SD45-2s. Several were also built as Tunnel Motors (SD45T-2) for Southern Pacific. A total of 1,260 were produced, and the last one was built in December 1971.

The SD45s used the same frame as the SD38s, SD39s, SD40s and SDP40s. Unfortunately the engine block was designed in such a way as to allow the crankshaft to flex beyond the breaking point, and these locomotives were often out of service on account of cracked shafts.

Built for Southern Pacific in 1966 as number 8800, it was the first of this model built for the SP, and one of a total of 356 SD-45s the railroad owned.  This first order of SD45s (numbers 8800 through 8844) were delivered with SP’s distinctive light package, with several headlights and mars lights, which UP removed sometime after the merger. They ran between Ogden and the West Coast via Donner Pass, and the 7457 was acquired by the museum on February 5, 2002. Union Pacific displayed their pair of locomotives decorated for the Salt Lake Winter Olympics at the dedication ceremony. Located in the Eccles Rail Center.

Builder………………………………….EMD

Built……………………………August 1966

Construction Number……………..…..31991

Power………………………..………3600 hp

Engines………………….V-20 model 645E3

SP 3769: GP9

The GP9 class was built between January 1954 and August 1963, although production in the U.S. ended in December 1959. A total of 4,115 A-units and 165 cabless B-units were built. The first GP9s on the Southern Pacific system were delivered in 1954 to the Texas & New Orleans.

Although it now wears the SP’s most recent “Bloody Nose” scheme, it was originally painted in the orange, silver and black “black widow” paint scheme. The 3769 was built in 1957 as number 5733. As part of a system-wide program, SP renumbered all of the GP9s into the 3400-3727 series, with the 5733 becoming 3574.  In 1970 it was rebuilt as a GP9E, and was renumbered again as 3769. It was retired on May 28, 1986, and donated on July 23, 1987. This locomotive was prepared as a display item by removing the traction motors and engines, and sealing all doors, rendering it an empty shell. Located on Track 2.

Builder…………………………………EMD

Built…………………..……..January 1957

Construction Number………………22922

Length……………………..56 feet 2 inches

Weight……………..……..……..240,000 lbs

Power……………..……………….1,750 hp

Tractive Effort……………………….65,000

Engines…………………..V16 model 567C

Brakes…………………..…..Westinghouse

D&RGW 5371: SD40T-2

The SD40T-2s were built for only two railroads, Southern Pacific and the Denver & Rio Grande Western. The “T” designates the special “Tunnel Motor” design that allows for cooler running through the long tunnels in the Sierras and Rockies. Conventional locomotives, with the radiator near the top of the locomotive, had a tendency to “suck” the air from the tunnel and overheat. Both SP and the D&RGW worked with EMD in designing a locomotive with a more managed air intake. The final design placed the radiator lower in the carbody, with large intake grills occupying the rear that allowed better access to the cooler air at the bottom of the tunnel rather than the hot exhaust near the top. The SD40T-2 classification is not official, and EMD simply refers to them as SD40-2s with “cooling system modifications”. A total of 312 were built between April 1974 and July 1980.

The locomotive fell under ownership of Union Pacific when UP acquired Rio Grande Industries, the parent company of the Southern Pacific and D&RGW. It was assigned UP number 8627 but never repainted.

In 2003 the locomotive received all-new wheels. Artist and Photographer Mike Danneman had an interest in the 5371 when she was still in operation, and photographed the locomotive often. In February 2006 the fireman’s side numberboard had fallen out, so he painted a new one. Sometime in its career repairs were made to the engineer’s side of the cab, and it received a hastily applied sans-serif number. This number was repainted to its original railroad roman to match the fireman’s side on November 5, 2007.

The 5371 was the last Tunnel Motor to remain unpatched and unpainted since the merger with Union Pacific, and last ran on the former Rio Grande trackage between Provo and Grand Junction, Colorado. It went to North Platte on November 13, 2006 for its last Triennial Inspection. It made its last revenue run on local LDP45 from Helper to East Carbon City on February 29th, 2008, and on March 7th it was sent to Cheyenne, arriving on March 9 and “adopted” by the UP Steam Team as an “honorary” steam engine. During the trip the numberboards were stolen, and replaced with new boards in sans-serif UP font. The shop crew applied a magnetic 3389 (the number of the Challenger) patch and UP shield to one side of the cab. The 5371 underwent minor repairs and was returned to Utah early in the following year.

Retired from the books on December 5, 2008, it was delivered to the museum on August 15, 2009 on Track 1, and was relocated to the Eccles Rail Center on March 29, 2010. The Golden Spike Chapter washed the unit in preparation for the dedication ceremony that took place on August 18, 2010, which featured an exhibit of several of Mike Danneman’s photographs of the 5371 in operation. Located in the Eccles Rail Center.

Builder…………..Electro-Motive Division (EMD)

Built……………………………………August 1975

Construction Number………………………..756046

Length………………………….…..70 feet 8 inches

Weight…………………………………..388,000 lbs

Fuel Capacity……………………..…..4,000 gallons

Power………………………………………3,000 hp

Engine……………………………V16 model 645E3

Top speed……………………………………65 mph

Generator output……………………2,240 kilowatts

UTAH 401: RSD-15

This locomotive was built for the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, as number 823, later renumbered as 9823 and retired in May 1975. It was then sold to Precision National, who sold it again to the Utah Railway who simply blocked out the Santa Fe lettering and gave it the number 401 without a complete repaint.  The Utah Railway retired it in May 1982 and sold it for scrap in 1983 to Industrial Salvage & Metals. It was traded to the Promontory Chapter, National Railway Historical Society in return for four Kennecott locomotives. The Promontory Chapter then sold it to the Wyoming & Colorado Railway, who leased it to Broken Arrow Inc, where it operated out of Tooele and Clive, Utah, switching the rotary dumper at the hazardous waste facility. In 1992 it was sold to Herzog, but left in Clive until donation to the museum. The long nose of this design gave it the nickname “alligator”. It was acquired by the museum in May 1998 through a trade. Located in the Eccles Rail Center.

Builder…………………………………..…….ALCO

Built………………………………………..July 1959

Construction Number………………………….83482

Weight……………………………….…..382,400 lbs.

Power……………………………..…………2400 hp

Engines………………16 cylinder 4 cycle Model 251

 

Locomotives- Steam

Total units: 3

UP 844: FEF-2

The 833 was built in October 1939 by the American Locomotive Company for Union Pacific as a class FEF-2 passenger engine. She is balanced for regular running at 90 miles per hour, but officially hit 110 miles per hour in a test and unofficially hit 120 mph (a speed that high was against company rules). The 833 ran between Ogden and Cheyenne. It was originally built with a single stack, but was modified sometime during its career with a double stack. It was removed from service in 1957. After being removed from the books in 1962 she was kept in Cheyenne for “historical purposes” until it was decided to donate the locomotive to Salt Lake City in 1972 for display in Pioneer Park. It was delivered in August 1972, and dedicated on October 25. Salt Lake transferred ownership of the locomotive to the Utah State Railroad Museum in 1999, and the 833 was moved by truck in February of that year.

            Early 2011 saw vandals knock out the storm wall of the cab. The Golden Spike Chapter took up the task of repairing and securing the wall, and it was discovered that the 833’s cab doors had been welded shut along the hinges. Sometime in the past someone had broke into the cab by forcing the door open, permanently damaging the hinge and cab frame. The door was removed and disassembled to find the wooden core completely disintegrated in dry rot. On display in the Eccles Rail Center.

Builder…………………………………..….ALCO (Schenectady)

Built…………………………………………………October 1939

Construction Number……………………………………….69174

Weight (Engine Only)………………………………….483,000 lbs

Weight (Engine and Tender)……………………….….889,500 lbs

Weight on drivers………………………………………270,000 lbs

Tractive effort……………………………………………63,800 lbs

Length, including tender………………..…113 feet, 10 1/8 inches

Driver diameter…………………………………………..80 inches

Boiler pressure…………………………………………….300 lbs.

Cylinders………………………………….………..25 x 32 inches

Power………………………………………….4100 hp at 67 mph

Fuel…………………………………………………………….Oil

Fuel capacity………………………………………….6,000 gallons

Water capacity………………………………..……23,500 gallons

Wheel arrangement………………………………..…………4-8-4

Tender………centipede, with single 4-wheel truck, roller bearings

UP 4436

            Built by the Baldwin Locomotive Works in March 1918 as a coal burner with a slope-back tender. UP classed it as an S-5 or S-51, and it is one of 20 locomotives of the same class. It was rebuilt as an oil burner around 1933, receiving its current Vanderbilt tender, and was assigned to Nebraska until World War II, when it was moved to Portland, Oregon. In 1947 it was moved to Evanston until retired in 1957. Retired September 6, 1958 and donated to Ogden City for display with Southern Pacific No. 1297 in Affleck Park. Later moved to the Union Station in 1993and repainted. Located on the Burton-Walker Spur.

Builder………………………Baldwin Locomotive Works

Built………………………………………..…March 1918

Construction Number……………………………….48200

Weight (Engine only)………………….………156,000 lbs

Weight (engine and tender)………..…………..245,600 lbs

Length…………………………………..60 feet, 8 inches

Cylinders……………………………………..21×26 inches

Wheel arrangement………………………………..…0-6-0

Weight on drivers……………………….…….156,000 lbs

Driver diameter………………………………….51 inches

Tractive Effort…………………………..……..34,400 lbs.

Fuel……………..Coal (1918-1933), Oil (1933-retirement)

Tender………………………………………….Vanderbilt

Tender Trucks…….Andrews, friction bearing, leaf springs

D&RGW 223 (C-16)

With any growing railroad a growing force of motive power is needed, and a search for greater horsepower arises. When the first Consolidation type locomotives were built for the Denver & Rio Grande, they were the largest narrow gauge locomotives in the world; only a few years later they would be dwarfed by other consolidation types that would be ordered. The first, No. 22 (The “Alamosa”) was built by Baldwin and delivered in 1877. A few years later the D&RG ordered several more locomotives of the same type, but Baldwin was unable to fulfill the contract and farmed off the work to the Grant Locomotive Works in New Jersey. The Grant eventually built 28 of the new 60N class locomotives to the Baldwin plans; these were the only non-Baldwin steam locomotives on the D&RG narrow gauge until the K-36s were built by the railroad’s Burnham shops.

Some confusion may be caused by the classification of 60N. When the C-16s were first built the Rio Grande utilized Baldwin’s practice of classifying locomotives according to weight. In the case of the narrow gauge Consolidations, that turned out to be around 59,350 pounds, which roughly rounds to 60,000 (interestingly, the 223’s current weight is 69,110 pounds). It wasn’t until the 1920s, when the D&RG was reorganized, that the practice of classifying locomotives by type (C for consolidation) and tractive effort (16,540 pounds) was adopted by the railroad. This wasn’t universal, however, and other railroads classified similar locomotives differently.

The 223 was delivered to the Burnham Shops in Denver, Colorado, in December 1881, and lived the life of any typical steam locomotive of the period, with numerous rebuilds, repairs, wrecks and even a few fires. She was burned in the Salida, Colorado shops in 1892, the Gunnison, Colorado roundhouse in 1905, and much later while behind the Shupe-Williams candy factory in Ogden, Utah in 2006.

Towards the final years of her life, the 223 was relegated to sporadic service assigned to the Baldwin Branch. The branch was built in 1882 by the Denver, South Park & Pacific Railroad. The DSP&P later became the Colorado & Southern (think “Georgetown Loop”). In the 1930s the Colorado & Southern was looking into abandoning the famous Alpine Tunnel because of low traffic and the ever-present snowdrifts that plague any high-mountain railroad. The C&S made a series of agreements with the D&RGW over track to Leadville and such, with the D&RGW finally taking over operations of the branch in trade for the Blue River Branch in 1911. The Rio Grande finally purchased the branch outright in 1937, with the C&S sweetening the deal with an offer of enough rail and material to upgrade the branch’s original DSP&P rail and stub switches. The 223 was assigned to one of the work trains, and after the upgrade she stayed behind with sisters 268 and 278.

The C-16s were permanently assigned to the Baldwin Branch for a single reason: bridges. While the D&RGW may have made an effort to upgrade the line, they did not include the trestles in their plans, and the ancient structures were unable to bear the weight of one of the heavier locomotives in service on the Rio Grande’s narrow gauge routes (the K class). There were few of the C class locomotives left by the 1930s, and the 223, 268 and 278 were three of them. There were other C-class locomotives, but the 271 was assigned as the Durango switch engine, and those in the 300 numbering were, once again, too large for the bridges.

By the time the 223 was retired, the president of the D&RGW was Wilson McCarthy, a radical change from the presidents that preceded him. McCarthy saw the value in strong public relations, and began donating the aging steam locomotive fleet to cities along the route as a PR move. As the narrow gauge roster was being downsized with the arrival of the K-class locomotives, the smaller C- and T-class locomotives were the first to go and the 223 was no exception.

In 1941 Salt Lake City had something big planned for the Pioneer Day celebration; they wanted a steam locomotive and requested one early in the year. The 223 was pulled from service and given the standard “donation makeover” of the World War II era:  a faux 1880s paint scheme with no basis on fact, a fake diamond stack and box headlight, and links in lieu of knuckles. Needless to say the 223’s 1920s body looked odd in such a guise.

On July 24th the 223 was paraded down Salt Lake’s main street. In the afternoon she was removed from the trailer and placed on a short stretch of track near the Tracy Aviary in Liberty Park alongside other items of historical significance, including a Utah Copper Co. ambulance and later, a halftrack from the war. A dedication ceremony was held, and the bombastic programs typical of the time went in wide distribution as memorable souvenirs of the event.

Life slowed down for the locomotive, but that didn’t make anything better. Locomotives are made of metal, and we all know metal rusts. Sitting uncovered doesn’t help, and things can’t get worse for a steam engine when the sprinklers water it as well as the lawn. City workers bent the fireman’s side main rod to keep the engine from rolling. The 223 decayed for years until 1980 when she was moved to a drier, but still unprotected, location behind the old Rio Grande/Western Pacific Union Station on Rio Grande Street.

The new location may have been more fitting than Liberty Park, but that didn’t mean much. There was talk about restoring the locomotive, but that’s just what it was-talk. The Utah State Historical Society hired the legendary John Bush to carry out a feasibility study. The results were not encouraging and the state gave up on the engine.

In 1991 the nearly-new Utah State Railroad Museum showed interest in the 223, and the Historical Society gladly gave her up to them. The 223 was moved to Ogden and placed behind the Shupe-Williams Candy Co. factory on 26th and Wall Avenue, just south of the Union Station, and reunited with several narrow gauge freight cars that had been on display in Pioneer Village at Lagoon Amusement Park. The freight cars burned in the 2006 candy factory fire, but the 223 was unharmed as all wood had been removed for restoration. The Golden Spike Chapter, R&LHS, is currently performing the restoration to operation.

Built: ………………………………………………………………….1881

Builder: …………………………………………Grant Locomotive Works

Construction number: …………………………………………………1436

Construction cost: ……………………………………………..$11,553.00

Locomotive Type: …………………………………Consolidation (2-8-0)

Classification: ………………………………………………….C-16 (60N)

Gauge ……………………………………………………36 inches (3 feet)

Length: …………………………………………………49 feet, 6 ¼ inches

Wheelbase: ………………………………………………41 feet, 11 inches

Height (to top of stack): ………………………………….11 feet, 5 inches

Cylinders: …………………………………………………….15×20 inches

Boiler Pressure: …………………………………………………160 pounds

Firebox dimensions: …………………………………………24×84 inches

Number of flues: ………………………………………………………….148

Flue dimensions: ………………………………..2 inches x 9 feet, 8 inches

Driving wheel diameter: …………………………………………36 inches

Pilot wheel diameter: …………………………………………….24 inches

Tender truck wheel diameter: …………………………………..…26 inches

Total weight (including tender): ……………………………122,110 pounds

Weight (locomotive only): ……………………………………69,110 pounds

Tractive effort: ………………………………………………16,540 pounds

Water capacity: …………………………………………………2500 gallons

Coal capacity: …………………………………………………………..6 tons

Valve Gear: ……………………………………………………….Stephenson

Rolling Stock-Passenger

Total cars: 5

UP 1896

This car started out as UP chair car number 5338, and was rebuilt in 1969 for the Golden Spike Centennial Expo, which was the 100th anniversary celebration of the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad. The modifications included blanking over the windows and the interior being lined with glass cases for the display of artifacts. It toured the UP system behind a special train of flatcars loaded with 1860s era equipment, and was the only car to receive this paint scheme. The trucks are unique and not used on any other UP cars. Located in the Eccles Rail Center.

UP 5819

This Railway Post Office car was built in September 1949 by American Car & Foundry and used on the Oregon Short Line (a UP subsidiary) between Ogden and Malad, Idaho. When Union Pacific lost its mail contracts many of the old RPO cars were relegated to Maintenance of Way service, including no. 5819. The car was painted in the UP’s maintenance green and renumbered as 903680 for use as a tool car. Very little was done to change the interior.

The car wound up in a private collection in Spokane, Washington, and was purchased by the museum for $21,000, a D&RGW lantern and three pieces of railroad china. It was moved by Union Pacific and arrived on May 10, 2001.  Restoration commenced immediately, with Northern Utah Glass donating the windows and Union Station volunteer Bryce Draper machining the replica catcher arms. The car was painted by Swift Painting. On display in the Eccles Rail Center.

Builder…………………………….…..AC&F

Built……………….……….September 1949

UP 9010 (Moon Glow)

            The Moon Glow is a dome-observation and the last car remaining from the four-car Train of Tomorrow that was built by Pullman-Standard and General Motors in 1943. The Train of Tomorrow was an experiment to demonstrate the possibilities of post-war technology when applied to rail travel, and included such luxuries as “Astra-domes” on all four cars, complete air conditioning and radio telephones. It toured the U.S. after World War II in 1947, and after the tour was purchased as a whole set by Union Pacific in 1950. It was assigned to trains 457 and 458 between Portland, Oregon and Seattle, Washington.

            The Moon Glow is equipped with a center dome and observation-lounge that combined could seat 68 people. Below the dome was a cocktail/snack bar and lunch counter. Restrooms were on the diaphragm end.

While in service the UP modified the observation end with a diaphragm to allow mid-train use, renumbering it to UP 9010. The Moon Glow was retired in November 1964 and sold to a junkyard in Pocatello, Idaho, where it was saved because the owner wanted to use it as the business office. That plan never materialized and the Moon Glow was recognized in 1990 and purchased by the Promontory Chapter, NRHS for the museum. The Air Force volunteered the time and materials to repair the windows, and moved it to Hill AFB, but terminated the partially completed project. It was moved for storage to Business Depot Ogden, where it remains today. In 2004 it served as a set for the movie Alien Express (originally called Dead Rail) that was released direct-to-video in 2005. A complete history of the Moon Glow can be found in the book The Train of Tomorrow by Ric Morgan.

Since the acquisition of the Moon Glow the rights to the names Train of Tomorrow, Moon Glow, and any other phrases have been purchased by the Union Station Foundation and are copyrighted as such.

Builder……………………………….……Pullman-Standard

Built………………………………………….……May 1943

Seating capacity…………………………………………175

Weight……………………………………………141000 lbs

USAX (no number) Army Hospital Car

This car was built during World War II to transport the homecoming injured of the war to the military hospitals scattered across the country. It may have been used for transportation of wounded to the hospital in Brigham City. Built by American Car & Foundry, It was discovered in the surplus lot at Smith & Edwards, and purchased by the Golden Spike Chapter R&LHS. The Chapter restored the car at the former Sugar Factory, then donated it to the museum in September 2001. The interior features a display prepared by the Utah Chapter of the American Red Cross. A sister car without trucks still resides at Smith & Edwards. On display in the Eccles Rail Center.

DAFX 31

Originally a Baltimore & Ohio heavyweight baggage car. The Air Force rebuilt it as a scoring crew support car for the Strategic Air Command to use in training B-52 bomber crews. It is the last car from a scoring set that was donated by the Air Force in 1991 (the remaining cars were scrapped in 2010). One end is equipped as a storage area (there are several cases of parts still inside), the middle has a shower, restroom and bunks for the scoring crew, and the other end once housed the computers used in evaluating training performance. It is located in the Eccles Rail Center.

During World War II, it was found that radar was a much more effective sighting method when carrying out a strategic bombing, and after the war radar was utilized in training missions that allowed real-location “bombing” without destruction using computers. This method was improved upon under the command of General Lemay, who created the 1st Combat Evaluation Group with 3 squadrons to undertake the evaluations of the training. Several training fields were established in remote areas of the country, but in response to the bomber crews’ familiarity to the these bombing ranges, three special trains, one for each squadron of the CEG, were arranged from second-hand equipment that would transport the bombing crews, radar equipment and radar support crews, as well as a complete squadron and commander, to new, unfamiliar locations.

The trains were completed and put in service around 1960. They consisted of two maintenance cars (converted boxcars, one for radar maintenance and one for support maintenance), four flatcars with radar vehicles, a generator car, four Pullman sleepers, a dining car, two day-room cars, and a command car as well as six supply cars, for a total of 21 cars. The support cars were painted blue with the SAC shield, and the radar cars white or silver with the SAC shield. These trains would travel across the country to various bases and training locations, including Utah. Hill Air Force Base was the designated repair location, and the trains would rotate through there every two years for work. When the scoring trains were phased out with the bombers that they were designed for during the Vietnam War, they were sent to Hill for storage.

The trains would be moved by a contracted railroad and dropped off on a pre-determined siding for up to six months at a time. A total of 30 people were assigned to each train, and in addition to the scoring duties were required to maintain the train, which included regular waxing of the paint.

 

Rolling Stock-Freight

Total cars: 11

UP 910261

This is a UP class B-50-21 boxcar, built for grain and lumber service. They were built at Omaha, Nebraska and Albina, Oregon. Previous classes in the series were built completely by UP crews to AAR specifications, but the B-50-21 class used frames built by the Ryan Car Company which differed slightly from the AAR plans. Last used in Maintenance of Way as a Materials Car, it was wired with lighting for use as a storage space for the restoration of D&RGW 223 until a proper shop was furnished. Located on Track 2.

Builder……………………………….Union Pacific Railroad

Built……………………………………………….…..1938

Roof……………………………………….….Murphy Panel

Wheels……………………………….33” dia. 5’6” wheelbase

Couplers……………………………………………….Type E

Brakes…………………………………………………….AB

Capacity……………………………………………10000 lbs

Length over couplers………………………………..44’ 2 ½”

Length over end sills…………………………..……40’ 8 ¼”

Trucks…..………….Bettendorf, friction bearing, coil springs

UP 57989

This flatcar, painted yellow with red lettering, currently holds the shell of BRR 126. In storage at Business Depot Ogden. It is a UP class F-70-29.

Built……………………………………………..…April 1970

Weight………………………………………………35200 lbs

Capacity……………………………………………152000 lbs

Trucks………………………………roller bearing, coil springs

UP 30212

This steel gondola, UP class G-70-4, is painted oxide red with yellow lettering. It is currently the idler car for UP 903037. Located on the Burton-Walker Spur.

Builder……………………………………….Bethlehem Steel

Built……………………………………………..January 1958

Weight……………………………………………………60000

Capacity………………………………………………..140000

Trucks……………………………..roller bearing, coil springs

DAFX 26026

            In storage at the Weber County Waste Transfer facility. The ladders have been cut to half-height and the brake wheel lowered, as well as the running boards removed. This car once had end doors that have since been blanked over.

Built………………………………………………………………………1942

Door……………………………………….Youngstown Corrugated six foot

Trucks…………………………….…..Bettendorf, roller bearing, coil springs

DAFX 26477

            Located on Track 2. This boxcar is classed by its builder as a PS-1 type, although this is a broad classification as PS-1 is also interpreted to include the any boxcar built by Pullman-Standard after World War II. The 40-foot PS-1 cars like this one were manufactured beginning in 1947, and were based on the 1944 AAR design. The side and end ladders originally reached all the way to the top of the carbody, but federal law introduced in the 1960s mandated that roof-height ladders and brake wheels be outlawed. As such, it has been modified with a low brake wheel, half-height ladders and removed rooftop running boards.

Builder………………..Pullman-Standard Car Manufacturing Co.

Built……………………………………………..…………..1951

Door………………………….Youngstown Corrugated eight foot

Capacity………………………………………….……….50 tons

Length……………………………………………40 feet 6 inches

Trucks………….ASF Ride Control, friction bearing, coil springs

DAFX 55175

Twin-bay pneumatic hopper car, painted blue with white lettering. In storage at Business Depot Ogden. The journal boxes were last repacked by Union Pacific in Ogden in 1977.

Built……………………………………………….….April 1952

Trucks……………..….Bettendorf, Friction Bearing, coil springs

DODX 10318

This is a split side, welded tank car used for the transportation of diesel fuel. It was originally built for the navy as USAX 10318, but transferred to the Air Force and moved to Hill Air Force Base, where its reporting mark was changed to DODX. Donated as a batch with the 44-tonners, it is currently in storage at the Weber County Waste Transfer facility.

General American Tank Car Co. began as German American Tank Car Company in 1898, but anti-German excitement during World War I cause the name change in 1916. The company began as a private car owner to lease cars to railroads, but soon specialized in constructing tank cars for both sale and leasing. The company is still based out of Chicago, although since 1933 it is now General American Transportation as it leases not only rail equipment but aircraft, mining equipment and marine vehicles.

Builder……………………General American Tank Car (GATX)

Built……………………………………………………June 1943

Weight……………………………………………………..85700

Capacity…………………………………………..10,000 gallons

Maximum PSI………………………………………………….60

Safety Valve PSI………………………………………………35

Trucks…………………Bettendorf, Friction bearing, coil springs

USAX 35826

This steel, wood-deck flatcar is currently used as an idler for UP X-250. Located in the Eccles Rail Center.

Builder……………………………..………Pressed Steel Car Co.

Built…………………………………………………….July 1953

Weight…………………………………………..………68900 lbs

Capacity……………………………………………….160000 lbs

Trucks………….Buckeye six-wheel, friction bearing, coil springs

USAX 38014

            Steel, wood-deck flatcar in storage at Business Depot Ogden. This car is lettered in both English and Korean (Korean along the top sill) and was used to transport rail equipment. It has a unique removable hand brake.

Built………………………………………………….April 1951

Builder……………………………….American Car & Foundry

Capacity…………………………………………..…150000 lbs

Load limit…………………………………………….183200 lbs

Light Weight…………………………………….……70300 lbs

Trucks…………Buckeye six wheel, friction bearing, coil springs

USAX 11278

This car is either an AC&F or General American Tank Type 21. Both American Car & Foundry and GATX based their car types after the year it was introduced, and the Type 21 were first made in 1921, and are nearly identical to the previous Type 17 cars. The Type 21 is descended from a line of similar designs that have been changed only by the manufacturing process since 1911, when the Type 11 car was introduced to become the most common tank car design in the U.S. The type 11 are distinguished from the even older Type 7 cars in that the running boards are level with the bolsters, the handrail runs completely around the tank, and ladders and platforms allow access to the dome. Type 11 cars were made in several different capacities from 6 to 10 thousand gallons, and had a single row of rivets on each vertical seam. After 1917 the government mandated that all seams have two rows of rivets, which caused the creation of the Type 17. In 1921 a new process was developed that allowed the tanks to be constructed from only two sheets of steel, wrapped around the circumference, which eliminated the need for vertical seams anywhere except the ends. The Types 11 through 21 were the two most common tank cars before World War II, and although most Type 11s and 17s were retired at the end of the war in favor of newer welded seam cars, some remained in private ownership to haul diesel fuel, including this one. An interesting detail is that the side safety valves on the dome have been replaced with a hose, allowing overflowing fuel to spill to the ground. It was used by the Marine Corps, but was assigned to Hill Air Force Base. Located on Track 2.

Builder……………………………American Car & Foundry

Built……………………………………….….October 1942

Weight…………………………………….………39400 lbs

Capacity………………………………10000 (9637) gallons

Max. PSI…………………………………………………..60

Trucks…………….Bettendorf friction bearing, coil springs

Brakes………………………….……….single vertical staff

WCLX 2571

            This car was leased to Wilson Car Lines by Chase Manhattan bank and are located on Track 2. Wilson Car Lines was a subsidiary of Wilson & Company Meat Packing Company, which was reorganized from the failed Saltzberger & Sons packing company in 1917 and named after Thomas E. Wilson, who managed the reorganization. Wilson & Co. became one of the 50 largest corporations in the country and rivaled Swift and Armour in both income and size of car fleets. As a side note, Wilson & Co. was the precursor of the famous Wilson Sporting Goods, as Wilson & Co. began manufacturing tennis racket strings from animal byproducts in 1926.

            Wilson & Co. had a packing house at about 900 West 21st Street, nearby the Ogden Stock Yard, which was the largest terminal stock yard west of Denver. Several other packing companies stood in direct competition, including the American Packing and Provisioning Co., W.C. Parke & Sons, and Ogden Dressed Meat Company. American Packing was bought out by Swift in 1949, and the Wilson facilities were purchased by W.C. Parke & Sons in 1943, but for some reason meat was still shipped in Wilson cars. Wilson & Co. manufactured Wilson Certified Hams, Continental Deli and Corn King brands of meat products.

            While some beef and pork was processed in the Ogden facility, a significant portion of the animals that passed through Ogden were sheep and that was the primary product of Ogden’s meat packing industry. In fact, Swift leased a fleet of specially modified Pacific Fruit Express cars to ship whole lambs out of Ogden. In 1945 an estimated 20,000 cars of sheep were sold, while 19,000 cars of cattle and only 6,000 cars of hogs were sold. At the peak around 1.8 million head of sheep passed through, either for slaughter or transfer to the east, while only 300,000 head of cattle stopped in Ogden.

            By the 1960s, good roads and larger trucks made it more economical to ship by truck than by train, and the large, rail-based stockyards began closing. The Wilson (Parke & Sons) plant finally closed in 1970, the same year that the Chicago Union Stockyards (the largest such facility in the world) shut down, and the large fleets of stock cars and reefers began to be sold off. The Ogden Union Stockyards held out until 1973 under the operation of the Weber Livestock Auction Co.

These cars (nos. 2571 and 2572) were discovered in a junkyard on 24th street and donated to the museum. They are ice cooled, with both ends occupied with large bunkers into which blocks of ice would be fed through the hatches on the roof. The Pacific Fruit Express Company operated a huge icing facility on the west side of the yard, obtaining natural ice from the 21st street pond. Later refrigerator cars utilized mechanical cooling, and the limited refrigerated rail operations (limited mostly to California produce) today still use diesel-powered cooling units to preserve the loads.

Built……………………………………………November 1957

Capacity………………………………………………80000 lbs

Weight………………………………………..………62500 lbs

Length…………………………………………33 feet 4 inches

Trucks……….ASF Ride Control, friction bearing, coil springs

WCLX 2572

See Above, same specs as WCLX 2571. In storage at the Weber County Waste Transfer facility.

Identical cars are found at the following locations: WCLX 2013, Fox River Valley Trolley Museum, Elgin, Illinois; WCLX 2711, Belton, Missouri; WCLX 2719, Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum, Chattanooga, Tennessee.

 

Rolling Stock-Cabooses

Total Cars: 9

UP 25176

The class CA-4 cabooses are nearly identical to the Class CA-3s. A total of 100 of each class were produced by Pullman-Standard Manufacturing Co. in Michigan City, Indiana between September and November 1944. They were built with wood-beam trucks and were painted freight car brown (UP called it Synthetic Red).

            All of the CA-4 cabooses were repainted in the yellow paint scheme in 1947. The wood beam trucks were replaced with all-steel outside-swing hanger trucks in an upgrade program in 1952. The 25176 is one of seven CA-4s that were upgraded for Pool service in 1975, which included upgraded toilets, shatter-proof single pane windows, refrigerators, oil heating, radios, roller bearing trucks, and steel platforms. The large “P” on the cupola was added as part of the upgrade to designate its pool service. It was built in October 1944 as UP 3876, renumbered in March 1959 and retired on January 3 1989. Located on the Burton-Walker Spur.

Builder…………………………………………….Pullman-Standard

Built………………………………..………………….October 1944

Trucks……………Outside-Swing hanger, roller bearing, coil spring

Brakes…………………………………………………………….AB

Wheels……………………….……………….33” dia., 5’ wheelbase

Couplers………………………………………………………Type E

Weight…………………………………………………….50850 lbs

Length over couplers…………………….…………………40’ 7 ¼”

Length over end sills……………………………………….30’ 11 ½”

Height to roof…………………………………………11’ 10 29/32”

Height to cupola……………………………..……………….16’ ½”

UP 25766

            This caboose was built in January 1921 by the Pacific Car & Foundry in Seattle, Washington, for Union Pacific subsidiary Oregon & Northwestern. Originally number 2624, it was renumbered in August 1962. It was retired in 1971, and restored by UP before donating it to the museum. Located in the Eccles Rail Center.

Length…………………………………………30 feet

Brakes……………………….……..Two vertical staff

Trucks……….…………..wood beam friction bearing

Wheels………………………….…………….33” dia.

Brakes…………………………………………….K-1

Couplers…………………………………….Type “E”

Weight……………………………..………..7870 lbs

Length over couplers………….……………..38’ 11”

Length over end sills…………….…………….30’0”

Height to roof…………………..………….11’ 9 ¾”

Height to cupola…………………..………..14’ 5 ½”

Width……………………………….……..10’ 2 1/8”

UCRY 25880

This was the last new caboose ordered by Union Pacific, built in July 1979 by International Car Co, although Utah Central painted it as built in June of that year. It is a CA-11 class bay window caboose, retired on January 3 1989 and donated to the museum. The Utah Central Railway leased it along with 44-tonner 1237 and gave it its current paint scheme. A few CA-11 cabooses are still used by Union Pacific as “shoving platforms” in yards, including Ogden.

The CA-11 cabooses were a development of the CA-10s that were delivered in 1975. It was based on Missouri Pacific’s bay-window design with a short body on a standard frame, which left extended-length platforms on each end. The final design for the CA-11s was approved in 1978 and the cars were built by International Car Company in Kenton, Ohio. Each one cost an average of $60,000, as opposed to the cost of $72,000 for each CA-10. A total of 100 were built.­­­­ Located on Track 2.

Builder…………………………………International Car Co.

Built……………………………………………….July 1974

Weight………………………………..…………..54500 lbs.

Trucks…………….AAR B-5052, roller bearing, coil springs

SP 1555

Class C-40-4 bay window caboose. Southern Pacific owned 200 of this type, and featured “frog eye” roof-mounted marker lights and external fuel tanks. As built, the bay window was painted all orange.  Located in the Eccles Rail Center.

Builder………………………………Pacific Car & Foundry

Built…………………………………….……..August 1961

Trucks………Barber-Bettendorf, roller bearing, leaf springs

SP 4666

Class C-50-8 bay window caboose, located on Track 2. SP owned 50 of these cars.

Builder…………………………….…International Car Co.

Built……………………………………………March 1979

Trucks…..….Barber-Bettendorf, roller bearing, leaf springs

D&RGW 01457

Extended vision caboose, located on Track 2.

Built……………………………………….………June 1966

Weight………………………………………………56600 lbs

Trucks……….Barber-Bettendorf, roller bearing, leaf springs

D&RGW 01504

Built at the D&RGW’s Burnham (Denver) shops in 1947 as part of series 01450-01459, this caboose was one of the first to be radio equipped, with a PRR-style rooftop induction antennae. It is all steel, but originally had four-pane wood-frame windows and was painted all-black with white lettering and two yellow stripes (to designate radio equipped). Cars in the series without radios did not have the double yellow stripes. The caboose was repainted in 1975 in the all-orange/black lettering “Action Road” scheme. Four-pane windows were rebuilt to double pane steel frame at this time, and later blanked over in September 1985. Located on the Burton-Walker Spur.

Builder………………………………….Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad

Built………………………………………………………………………..…1947

Trucks………… Barber-Bettendorf (cast D&RGW) Roller Bearing, leaf springs

KMC 425

            This caboose was probably built as number 025 for the Utah Copper Company for use in the Ore Delivery Department. It is part of series 022 through 025 that were built by Pacific Car & Foundry. Cars 022-023 were delivered in December 1937, and cars 024-025 were delivered in February 1947. All were wood sheathed over a steel frame. Between 1950 and 1954 they were rebuilt at the Utah Copper car shops in Magna, with the wood sheathing covered with steel. In addition, Onan Power Units (diesel generators), Motorola Telephone radios, headlights and permanent markers for backup moves, a 55 gallon fuel tank, and battery box were installed. It was painted yellow with green trim, similar to the current condition of KMC 423. Located in the Eccles Rail Center.

Builder…………………………….…Pacific Car & Foundry

Body length……………………………..…..19 feet 9 inches

Length over couplers………………………………….28 feet

Height…………………………………….…13 feet 5 inches

Width…………………………………..……..9 feet 4 inches

Weight…………….………………………………3900 lbs.

Brakes………………………. “AB”, two Ajax Hand Power

Trucks………..………Vulcan, friction bearing, leaf springs

Journals………………………………………..……4 ¼ X 8

Wheels…………………………………..33” one wear steel

Wheelbase………….……………………..…5 feet 6 inches

KMC 423

            See Above, same specs as KMC 425. Probably ex-UCCo. 023. This caboose never wore the KCC reporting mark in operation. When first donated someone renumbered it as KCC 429, a car that was never on the Kennecott roster. On display as part of the Utah State Railroad Museum inside the station.

 

Rolling Stock- Miscellaneous

Total cars: 3

HVRR B-2

The origin of this car is unknown, although it is guessed to have started out as a tender for a steam locomotive. It was converted into a rotary snow plow during World War II for use at the Navy base in Mina, Nevada. It was transferred to the Tooele Army Depot, where it was retired and donated to the Tooele Valley Railroad Museum in Tooele. That museum deemed it to be surplus as they already had a plow, and sold it to the Heber Valley railroad in 1993, who painted it in its current colors (the old HVRR paint scheme) and modified it for use as a power car on passenger trains. The rotary plow is still in Heber. Located on the Shupe-Williams Spur.

Trucks………..Arch bar with safety chains, friction bearing, coil springs

Brakes……………………………………………………….vertical staff

UP 2002 Olympic Torch Relay Car (no number)

This car was modified from a similar car built for the 1996 Atlanta, Georgia, Winter Olympics. It was part of a special train UP produced for the 2002 Olympics, with two SD70M locomotives specially painted to match the car. The car was rebuilt in Kansas City and outfitted with seven 250 gallon capacity propane tanks to keep the torch lit for three days. After the Olympics UP gave it to the Union Station under long-term loan. Located in the Eccles Rail Center.

Trucks…………..Roller Bearing, coil springs

Merci Boxcar

After World War II, the humanitarian aid donated by the American people prompted France to send a train of 49 freight cars loaded with gifts from their people in thanks in 1949. It was called the Train de la Reconnaissance Francaise, or the French Gratitude Train, and toured the country, two cars to a flatcar as none of them were standard gauge. There was one car for each state at the time (Hawaii and Alaska had not yet been admitted to the Union, but the 49th car was to be split between Hawaii and Washington D.C.), and after the tour the cars were distributed to each for display. Utah’s went to Memory Grove  in Salt Lake City, and was given a coat of army (olive) green paint, but was damaged in the 1999 tornado and sent to Ogden in 2006, where it was refurbished by a division of the American Legion called the La Societe des Quarente Hommes et Chavaux after the nickname for this kind of car. The work was accomplished with help from other organizations as well.

Built in the 1885 in Lyon, France, this four-wheel boxcar received the name because of its capacity during World War 1, and which was stenciled on each car: 40 men, or eight horses. These boxcars were used to transport troops all across Europe during the first World War, and in fact many new cars of identical design were constructed in the U.S. for use by the militaries of the allied powers of that war and eventually during World War II. David Eccles, who owned the Utah-Idaho Central railroad, Amalgamated Sugar, and Utah Construction Company, among others, was one of the American contractors to build the new cars for the war.

The specially constructed cars are not to be confused with those sent as part of the French Gratitude Train, as only cars built in France were included. Most of the artifacts that were included with the car have been lost, but those that survived are in the possession of the Utah State Archives and are on loan to the Utah State Railroad Museum for display. Out of the 49 original cars, 47 survive and Utah’s is listed as being one of the best preserved out of all of them. It was dedicated on July 11, 2009. This car is on display on its own track in front of the Burton-Walker Spur.

 

Rolling Stock- Maintenance of Way (MOW)

Total cars: 5

UP X-250

This was built by American Hoist & Derrick Co. (Industrial-Brownhoist) in 1967 for the Missouri Pacific Railroad. Originally assigned to Little Rock, Arkansas, it was acquired by UP when it and the MP merged. It was retired and stored in Salt Lake City during the 1990s until donated to the museum by Dennis Durbano. These large cranes were popularly called “big hooks”, and were the mainstay of wrecking trains across the country until powerful, more mobile bulldozers and truck cranes rendered them obsolete. Located in the Eccles Rail Center.

Built……………………………………………..June 1967

Power………………………………………………….diesel

Lifting capacity………………………..…………..250 tons

Weight……………………………….…………..379000 lbs

Trucks……Buckeye six-wheel, coil springs, roller bearings

UP 903037

Built by Industrial Works, this crane was delivered as UP 02787 and renumbered to 03037, then again to its current number, 903037. It was built as a coal burner but converted to oil. In 1967 it was stationed in Salina, Kansas. It was stored at Business Depot Ogden before being moved to the Station. In 2011 it was moved to its current location on the end of the maintenance train on the Burton-Walker spur. Two similar units are operational today, one in Ely, Nevada on the Nevada Northern Railway and one at the Mid-Continent Railway Museum in Wisconsin. Industrial Works later merged with Brownhoist to form the Industrial-Brownhoist company, which built no. X-250.

Builder………………….Industrial Works

Built………………………………..1910

Construction Number………..……. 2125

Weight………………………222440 lbs.

Power…………….Steam, self-propelled

Trucks……….. Arch-bar friction bearing

UP 902207

Tender for UP 903037. It is a UP class 12-C-337. Instead of a drawbar on the locomotive end, it is equipped with a standard coupler to allow use with other equipment. Equipped with a small gasoline pump manufactured by the Construction Machinery Co. for non-motive power use (e.g. washing, putting out fires). Located on the Burton-Walker Spur.

Builder……………….Commonwealth Steel Co.

Type………………………….………..Vanderbilt

Trucks…….……………6-wheel, friction bearing

OWR&N 900061

This rotary snow plow was built in 1912 by Alco/Rogers as the Oregon, Washington Railway & Navigation Co. number 061, and was based out of Pocatello, Idaho. It spent its entire life working in the Pacific Northwest. It was overhauled in 1951, receiving new steel sheathing and repainted silver with a red plow (it was originally brown with white lettering). The original tender was modified to be an auxiliary water tender but was not included with the donation. It was retired in 1978 as one of the last pieces of steam-powered equipment on the UP system. It was stored at Business Depot Ogden for several years where vandals and transients broke out all windows and burned the cab. Located on the Burton-Walker Spur.

Sister rotary No. 762 of the Oregon Short Line (constructed number 51166) resides at the Mid-Continent Railway Museum in Wisconsin.

Builder………………………..…………American Locomotive Company

Built…………………………..…………………………….………….1912

Construction Number…………………………..…..…..…………….51167

Power……………………………….….……………………………..Steam

Non-powered trucks (requires pusher locomotive)

Trucks…………………….……Riveted steel, friction bearings, no springs

Blade Diameter…………………………………………….…………11’ 4”

Cut width………………………………………………….…………….12’

UP 907827

See above. The tender for OWR&N 900061, originally from a 2-10-2 that was scrapped circa 1951. UP class13-C-124, located on the Burton-Walker Spur.

Type…………………………………….…….………………….Vanderbilt

Trucks…………………………….Andrews, Friction Bearing, leaf springs

 

Interurban

Total cars: 4

SLG&W (no number)

The open-air cars have their origins in a series of St. Charles Car Co. cars that were purchased in 1893 by the Salt Lake & Los Angeles, predecessor of the SLG&W. The cars were rebuilt in the SLG&W’s shops in 1922, utilizing the trucks and hardware, but using new frames from the American Bridge Company and replacing the wood. The clerestory roofs were modified as simpler Harriman-style “dome” roofs. The rebuilt cars were numbered in the series 301 through 313. They were equipped with air brakes and train lines, which allowed multiple-unit operation when sandwiched between two closed powered cars. They had no lights, and many who rode the cars at night likened the experience to the “tunnel of love” due to the slow speed of the train and festive atmosphere of the resort goers.

Upon abandonment, two cars were purchased by the Sons of Utah Pioneers and displayed in Corinne. In 1979 the SUP museum was dissolved and the cars were purchased by the Timponongos Preservation Society, operator of the Heber Valley Railroad at the time, and moved to Heber in 1980. One car was later sold to the Western Railway Museum in Rio Vista California in 1993, and is guessed to be number 306. The car in Heber was given a coat of historically inaccurate pink paint but not lettered, but unfortunately was scrapped due to an accidental fire in 2009. The car at the WRM is stored in Car House One at their museum, painted all-orange but in similar physical condition as the USRRM cars and waiting restoration. The WRM found that the car was first painted Pullman Green with grey running boards, then later received the black and orange scheme.

The cars in possession of the USRRM were purchased by the Promontory Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society and donated to the museum. The exact number of any of the cars are not known.

The post-rebuild cars wore two paint schemes, the first with the railroad name spelled out in a Railroad Roman type font and numbers on both ends of the letterboard (this was probably the Pullman Green scheme).

Later, the cars were painted black and orange, with the numbers in the same locations, but the words “Salt Lake, Garfield & Western” were replaced with the railroad’s popular name, “Saltair”. In storage at the Business Depot Ogden.

Open cross bench interurban trailer, 19 benches

Passenger capacity seated…………………114

Passenger capacity standing……………….150

Total passenger capacity per car……………250

Total car weight………………..40,000 pounds

Dimensions:

Width…………………………………….11’6”

Length over pulling faces…………………55’8”

Height…………………………………….12’ 8”

Truck centers………………………………38’ 1”

Truck wheelbase……………………………..66”

Trucks:

Standard Car Truck Company of Chicago, arch bar with leaf springs (friction bearing)

Wheels…………………………33-inch diameter

Axle…………………………..4 3/4” diameter

Journals………………..4 1/4 X 8 plain bearings

Air brake equipment:

Westinghouse Traction Brake, AMM, control pipe system

Triple valve………………………………..M2A

Brake cylinder…………………………..12 X 12

Hand brake………………….. two vertical staff

Couplers:

Janney radial couplers, fixed at the carrier

SLG&W (no number)

See above. In storage at the Business Depot Ogden.

BRR 126

Known as a “bullet car”, this interurban was built as one of five in 1932 for the Fonda, Johnstown & Gloversville in New York. The FJ&G abandoned its Electric Division in 1938, which terminated all passenger traffic on the line. The bullet cars were returned to Brill, who sold them to the Bamberger in 1939, and kept its original paint, excepting the replacement of the words “Gloversville-Johnstown-Amsterdam-Schenectady” with the Bamberger name. The cars were meant to operate individually, and had no couplers or MU controls, although multiple cars were moved with a drawbar. Towards the end of their lives Bamberger considered equipping the cars with MU but decided against it as passengers began taking to the roads instead of public transportation. The cars were sold to the Utah Pickle Company and stripped for use as housing for migrant workers. Three of the five cars remained when the UPCo. Closed its plant and sold off the bodies.

            Of the three, No. 127 made its way to the Orange Empire Railway Museum in Perris, California, and has been restored to operation lettered for the Bamberger. The other is the front of the Art City Trolley in Springville. No. 126 exists as a body only. In storage at the Business Depot Ogden.

Builder………………………………………Brill

Built…………………………….………..….1932

Trucks…………………………………..Brill 89E

Wheels……………………………………28” dia.

Wheelbase……………………………………6’-0”

Length……………………………….….46’-11”

Brakes…………………………..…….Magnetic

Top speed………………………..………75 mph

Door width……………………………..…3’-5”

Window width (to post centers)………….2’-9”

Aisle width…………………………..……2’-0”

Seating capacity………………………………..48

SL&U 851

            This interurban trailer was built for the Salt Lake & Utah, which ran between Salt Lake City and Payson and was known locally as the Orem Line. It was built by Niles in 1914 specifically for carrying milk, and was double-sheathed wood with two four-pane windows on each side. It was rebuilt in 1922, when the windows were filled in and the car was sheathed with steel, painted Chinese Red with gold lettering. Upon abandonment of the Orem Line the car was used as a shed in Granger, Utah, until the owner realized its heritage and donated it to the station. It was damaged by a fire caused by transients in 2009. It is equipped with a desk, probably for handling packages and Railway Express Agency shipments. Located on blocks in the Eccles Rail Center.

Motorcars & Miscellany

Total items: 6

 

WMRY 186 (motorcar)

            This home-built motorcar was donated by Kennecott. Why it has the reporting mark WMRY is unknown (WMRY stands for Western Maryland Railway). Enclosed cab, air conditioning, four person capacity (one driver and three passengers), small flatbed on rear. On display next to the Laundry Building.

MT 1919 (motorcar)

            Fairmont model MT-19, incorporated into the Maintenance-of-Way exhibit inside the station. While officially called motor cars, unofficially they are known by many names including speeders and pop cars, the latter from the quick popping noise of the engine. Open rear wall, no doors, single seat.

Motorcar

            Fairmont model MT-19. In covered storage in the Laundry Building. Operational when donated.

Velocipede

            This wooden velocipede is incorporated into the Maintenance-of-Way exhibit inside the station. Velocipedes are ridden like a bicycle, but are propelled not by foot pedals but by the back-and-forth motion of the handlebars.

Handcar

            This replica handcar, lettered as the Gandy Dancer, was built in the 1980s and was utilized in the 1983 handcar championship. It has been incorporated into the Maintenance of Way exhibit.

Motorcar Trailer

            4-wheel flatbed trailer for use with motorcars, manufactured by Fairmont. In the Maintenance-of-Way exhibit.

 Special Thank You:  Joshua Bernhard for his terrific research,  making this webpage possible. 

Sources

Essential Freight Cars: 44 Union Pacific’s ACR Boxcars, by Ted Culotta. Railroad Model Craftsman, February 2009, pp.90-91
 
Essential Freight Cars: 45 AC&F Type 11 Tank Cars, by Ted Culotta. Railroad Model Craftsman, July 2009, pp.80-82
 
Utah State Railroad Museum Equipment Inventory. January 13, 2005. Provided by Richard Carroll.
 
Cargill Flour SW1 Donated to Utah State Railroad Museum, by Joshua Bernhard. The Colorado Time-Table, August 2011, p.3
 
Collection Catalog entry for SLG&W 306, from the Western Railway Museum.
 
Railway Reflections, Stephen L. Car and Gilbert H. Bennet. Ogden Union Station Foundation, Ogden, Utah. 1999
 
Last of a Breed: A Rio Grande Finale at Helper, Utah, by Mike Danneman. 2 Ponies Publishing, 2009.
 
History of Denver & Rio Grande Western Narrow Gauge Locomotive Number 223, by Jerry Day.
 
The Train of Tomorrow, by Ric Morgan. Indiana University Press, 2007.
 
Golden Spike Chapter, R&LHS website www.trainweb.org/GoldenSpikeLRHS/
 
The following articles from Wikipedia:
EMD SD45 Ÿ EMD GP9 Ÿ EMD DDA40X Ÿ EMD SD40T-2 Ÿ Union Pacific GTELs Ÿ GTEL Ÿ ALCo S-1 and S-3 Ÿ Thomas E. Wilson Ÿ GE 44-ton Switcher Ÿ Strategic Air Command
 
The Chicago Encyclopedia http://encyclopedia.chicagohistory.org/pages/2681.html
Don Strack’s utahrails.net
http://espee.railfan.net locomotive and caboose rosters
Diagrams: Bingham & Garfield Ry. –Utah Copper Co. –Locomotives and Tenders – Cars, Combined B&G and UCCo diagram book, digitized by Don Strack.
Radar Bomb Scoring, letter by Don Ross, 11th RBS Squadron 1st Combat Evaluation Group.
Special thanks to the following people:
Dan Kuhn, Lee Witten, Michael Burdett, Steven Smith, Don Strack
40 X 8 Car dedicated, Hostler News, Volume 22 Number 8, August 2009 page 6
www.trainweb.org/web_lurker/GM/ Train of Tomorrow information
Union Pacific Freight Cars: 1936-1951 by Terry Metcalfe, 1989. Metcalfe Publishing, Englewood Colorado.
Cabooses of the Union Pacific Railroad by Don Strack and James L. Ehernberger, 2002. Union Pacific Historical Society, Cheyenne, Wyoming.
UP Color Guide to Freight and Passenger Equipment, Vols. 1 & 2, by Lou Schmidtz
Locomotive & Railway Preservation, December 1995